Automatic Identification/Datacapture, AIDC, RFID

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service. The first RFID solutions were developed in 1980s. It has since been deployed in a range of markets including Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems due to RFID's ability to track moving objects. RFID is also effective in challenging manufacturing environments where barcode labels might not prove resilient enough.

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Manufacturing & Logistics IT December Reference Annual 2020

Manufacturing & Logistics IT December Reference Annual 2020

Welcome to the December 2020 edition of Manufacturing & Logistics IT. In this edition we feature a Special Technology Report looking in depth at the latest developments in the world of Printing & Labelling technology.

Also included is our 2020 Special Report round-up, featuring reports on Transportation Management and AIDC/Mobile Computing.

Dakota interview with QE Transport: Paul Bowmaker, Head of Transport, Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust

Dakota interview with QE Transport: Paul Bowmaker, Head of Transport, Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust

Dakota Integrated Solutions spoke with Paul Bowmaker, Head of Transport at QE Transport, to find out how Dakota has worked with him and his team to implement a new Electronic Point of Delivery (ePod) solution aimed at streamlining and improving the tracking of the movement of specimens from various healthcare facilities, such as GP surgeries, hospitals and pharmacies, to laboratories for testing.

Lydia knows exactly who is speaking

Lydia knows exactly who is speaking

In an effort to ensure even greater reliability in voice recognition, EPG (Ehrhardt + Partner Group) has incorporated machine learning into its latest release. The system reacts to the volume of the input signal coming from the speaker and automatically ignores it if there’s a significant deviation.

XPO Logistics increases productivity and safety in e-commerce warehouses with touchless machine vision scanners

XPO Logistics increases productivity and safety in e-commerce warehouses with touchless machine vision scanners

XPO Logistics, the global provider of transport and logistics solutions, has deployed 370 state-of-the-art barcode scanners with machine vision in warehouses in the UK, Spain, France and the Netherlands. The fixed-mount, computerised scanners speed the reading of inventory data, while replacing shared, handheld scanners with a more hygienic solution.

Fully antibacterial phone – every external surface of the Cat® S42 rugged smartphone has advanced antimicrobial product protection applied

Fully antibacterial phone – every external surface of the Cat® S42 rugged smartphone has advanced antimicrobial product protection applied

Bullitt Group, the global licensee for Cat phones, has announced that the Cat S42 has been enhanced by advanced antimicrobial product protection, claimed by the company to make it the first anti-bacterial phone. Every exterior component of the product has been treated with Biomaster antimicrobial technology and tested to ISO 22196.

COVID-19 drives further growth in contactless payments

COVID-19 drives further growth in contactless payments

Contactless payments have taken a leap forward during 2020, in part driven by concerns around the potential spread of COVID-19. In the Nordics, the contactless payment ratio has grown from around 57 per cent in early January to 75 per cent of all in-store card payments in late October this year, according to data from Nets, the Nordic payment provider.

Basware introduces spend insights dashboard to provide visual, single view of entire spend & cost-cutting recommendations

Basware introduces spend insights dashboard to provide visual, single view of entire spend & cost-cutting recommendations

Basware has launched two enhancements to its Analytics solution: a new, highly visual Spend Insights dashboard and a new functionality to enable payment performance analysis.

Three costly common misunderstandings about 5G, identified by IDTechEx

Three costly common misunderstandings about 5G, identified by IDTechEx

5G is a rapidly growing market and will reach 300 billion USD by 2025 as forecast in the IDTechEx report ‘5G Technology, Market and Forecasts 2020-2030’.

SATO Europe launches Russian website

SATO Europe launches Russian website

SATO, the global developer of auto-ID and labelling solutions, has launched a new Russian version of its website. The platform will enable the company to showcase its extensive market knowledge, product offering and technical expertise to the region.

Tis the season for a customer database health check

Tis the season for a customer database health check

By Barley Laing, UK Managing Director at Melissa. 

With the festive ads of big retailers hitting our screens and Black Friday not far away, the busiest trading period of the year is getting into full swing. 

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart. These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.

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