Automatic Identification/Datacapture, AIDC, RFID

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service. The first RFID solutions were developed in 1980s. It has since been deployed in a range of markets including Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems due to RFID's ability to track moving objects. RFID is also effective in challenging manufacturing environments where barcode labels might not prove resilient enough.

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Acne Studios chooses payments company Adyen to deliver a first-class experience for shoppers globally

Acne Studios chooses payments company Adyen to deliver a first-class experience for shoppers globally

The Stockholm-based luxury fashion house Acne Studios has chosen payments tech company Adyen to deliver a first-class shopping experience for customers in APAC, North America and Europe – including its stores in the UK.

QR Code celebrates 25 Years of innovative Data Collection

QR Code celebrates 25 Years  of innovative Data Collection

The QR Code was invented for Toyota by DENSO in 1994 by Masahiro Hara. In 2014, it won the European Inventor Award. 25 years later, the question arises as to whether the QR Code requires a security update. DENSO WAVE EUROPE meets these requirements with the Secure QR Code (SQRC®).

Made for high speed sorting applications: AV500™, the new imager by Datalogic

Made for high speed sorting applications: AV500™, the new imager by Datalogic

Datalogic introduces the AV500™ imager, an innovative 2D image-based barcode reader developed for sorting applications. The new imager solves high speed applications in retail e-Commerce, postal/parcel sortation and airport baggage handling, covering all conveyor sizes, as well as static reading applications.

NetApp appoints Matt Watts as Chief Technology Officer, EMEA, and promotes Johannes Wagmueller to Lead Solutions Engineering in the Geo

NetApp appoints Matt Watts as Chief Technology Officer, EMEA, and promotes Johannes Wagmueller to Lead Solutions Engineering in the Geo

NetApp, the data authority for hybrid cloud, has appointed Matt Watts to the newly created role of Chief Technology Officer (CTO), EMEA, and promoted Johannes Wagmueller to lead solutions engineering, EMEA. Watts and Wagmueller report to Alexander Wallner, Senior Vice President & General Manager for NetApp in EMEA, and join his executive leadership council.

UK shoppers shun fingerprint scanners and facial recognition in favour of traditional passwords, new FIS report reveals

UK shoppers shun fingerprint scanners and facial recognition in favour of traditional passwords, new FIS report reveals

New research from global financial technology provider FIS has found that UK consumers remain wary of anti-fraud technologies like biometrics, while at the same time are growing increasingly worried about having their personal information hacked.

UK retailers to regain £7.23 million each year by going cashless

UK retailers to regain £7.23 million each year by going cashless

Analysing the annual revenue of the UK retailers with the fastest profit growth reveals a total potential recovery of £7.232 million each year as a result of refusing cash payments.

Chainway Releases High-performance Handheld Computer C66 and C61

Chainway Releases High-performance Handheld Computer C66 and C61

Chainway has announced the launch of the newly upgraded 5.5-inch large screen handheld computer C66 and the handheld computer C61 with keypad. Both devices deliver excellent system performance, and can be flexibly equipped with a range of optional data collection functions to fulfill applications in various industries such as retail, logistics and so forth.

Barcoding, Inc. shares new research and resources for businesses migrating to Android mobile computing in 2020

Barcoding, Inc. shares new research and resources for businesses migrating to Android mobile computing in 2020

Barcoding, Inc. has released initial findings from its comprehensive research project that addresses Windows Mobile going end of life in 2020. Rugged device manufacturers have selected Android as the new operating system, requiring a tailored technological shift for all enterprises leveraging Windows Mobile devices for their automated data collection processes.

DENSO WAVE INCORPORATED and RFKeeper expand their RFID Solutions

DENSO WAVE INCORPORATED and RFKeeper expand their RFID Solutions

DENSO WAVE INCORPORATED and RFKeeper conclude a business collaboration agreement aiming at expanding their RFID solutions and increasing their awareness level in the market.

How do you ‘schuh’? Shoe retailer optimises processes with DENSO handhelds

How do you ‘schuh’? Shoe retailer optimises processes with DENSO handhelds

Footwear retailer schuh uses the BHT-1505BB handheld terminal from DENSO WAVE EUROPE. The branded shoe stockist was looking for a mobile data collection device to reduce the stock take time in their 132 stores in the UK and Ireland.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart. These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.

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