Manufacturing Software, ERP, MRP

Manufacturing software systems are important tools for the automation and management of production processes. A wide range of manufacturing companies covering many different vertical sectors rely on manufacturing software to better manage the sourcing and use of material or parts quantities, scheduled production timelines, inventory management and the planning for future order demand. One commonly deployed example of a manufacturing software system is an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solution, designed to better manage information concerning orders and materials, finance, Customer Relationship Management etc. over the whole organisation.

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Infor brews better business processes for Fuller's

Infor brews better business processes for Fuller's

Infor, provider of business applications specialized by industry and built for the cloud, has announced that Fuller, Smith and Turner P.L.C. (Fuller's), an independent British brewer with a portfolio of almost 400 pubs, has chosen Infor CloudSuite Food & Beverage as the basis of a radical business process transformation project to drive growth.

Manufacturing SMEs optimistic about post brexit opportunities

Manufacturing SMEs optimistic about post brexit opportunities

Almost half of SMEs (49%) across the manufacturing sector have aspirations for growth over the next three months, compared with only 31% six months ago immediately after the EU referendum, according to the new quarterly research from Hitachi Capital's British Business Barometer.

AI will power 95% of customer interactions by 2025, says Servion

AI will power 95% of customer interactions by 2025, says Servion

Businesses are failing to prepare for a future led by Artificial Intelligence (AI), virtual reality, augmented reality and holograms, Servion Global Solutions has warned.

Beyond ERP; how manufacturers can become a digital enterprise

Beyond ERP; how manufacturers can become a digital enterprise

By Phil Lewis. Vice President, Solution Consulting EMEA at Infor.

As manufacturers strive to be on the front line of innovation, they must stop, look, listen and plan their strategy for being the Digital Enterprise of the future.

As food waste hits the business agenda, manufacturing should be a priority as a profitable waste reduction target, says InfinityQS

As food waste hits the business agenda, manufacturing should be a priority as a profitable waste reduction target, says InfinityQS

Champions 12.3, an international coalition dedicated to moving the world towards halving the amount of global food waste by 2030, has released research demonstrating how organisations can save $14 (approximately £12) for every $1 (approximately 80p) invested in reducing food waste.

Survey reveals a need for EDI integration among ERP users

Survey reveals a need for EDI integration among ERP users

Almost 88% of EDI users have an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) system, a MRP (Materials Resource Planning) system or other planning system, according to a survey of companies conducted recently by leading EDI company, Data Interchange.

Genesys acquires Silver Lining Solutions to enrich workforce optimisation product offering

Genesys acquires Silver Lining Solutions to enrich workforce optimisation product offering

Genesys, the global provider of omnichannel customer experience and contact centre solutions, has completed the acquisition of privately held Silver Lining Solutions Ltd., a provider of employee performance optimisation software and Genesys OEM partner.

The need to systemise critical business processes could mean the end of the spreadsheet, suggests Crimson & Co

The need to systemise critical business processes could mean the end of the spreadsheet, suggests Crimson & Co

Organisations can no longer afford to be heavily reliant on spreadsheet programmes to manage increasingly complex planning processes.

According to Eddie Groom, Consultant at global supply chain consultancy Crimson & Co, spreadsheets are often introduced as a temporary technology to support planning and modelling processes, but typically end up taking permanent residence within an organisation, leading to massive deficiencies amongst critical business practices.

UK Manufacturing sector still on the up in February figures

UK Manufacturing sector still on the up in February figures

The latest Markit/CIPS UK Manufacturing Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) showed strong growth in both new orders and output for February, reflecting an upturn in both domestic and overseas business.

Ideagen launch new enterprise safety management and incident reporting software, Ideagen Coruson

Ideagen launch new enterprise safety management and incident reporting software, Ideagen Coruson

Software firm Ideagen has launched Ideagen Coruson – a re-brand of its enterprise safety management and incident reporting software.

Manufacturing software systems

Manufacturing software systems provide the automation and computational support for complex manufacturing processes. Manufacturing companies leverage manufacturing software systems to carefully manage the timing, types and quantities of materials they purchase in order to ensure that they are able to meet current and future customer demand while at the same time achieving the lowest possible cost and inventory accumulation.

 

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems integrate internal and external management information across an entire organization, embracing finance/accounting, manufacturing, sales and service, customer relationship management, etc. ERP systems facilitate the flow of information between all business functions inside the boundaries of the organisation and manage the connections to outside stakeholders.

 

Manufacturing resource planning (MRP II) addresses operational planning in units, financial planning, and has a simulation capability to answer "what-if" questions and extension of closed-loop MRP.

 

CRM or Customer Relationship Management concerns the relationship between an organisation and its customers. The scope of CRM which can vary drastically as it can be used by management, salespeople, people providing service, and even customers could directly access information to find out information.

 

Cloud computing can be defined as the set of hardware, networks, storage, services, and interfaces that combine to deliver aspects of computing as a service. Cloud services include the delivery of software, infrastructure, and storage over the Internet and is based on user demand. Cloud Computing  is the latest stage in the Internet's evolution, providing the means through which everything , from computing power to computing infrastructure, applications, business can be delivered to you as a service wherever and whenever you need.

 

Cloud computing has some essential characteristics: scalability depending on requirements, offers a way to increase capacity or add capabilities on the fly without investing in new infrastructure, eliminates the need for on-site personnel to maintain computer equipment. No up-front CAPEX (capital expenditure) required, as billing is a pay-as-you-go model, access to the very latest application programming interfaces (APIs).

 

SaaS (software as a service) is a type of cloud computing delivering a single application through the browser to thousands of customers using a multitenant architecture. On the customer side, it means no upfront investment in servers or software licensing; on the provider side, with just one app to maintain, costs are low compared to conventional hosting. SaaS is emerging to provide service to all aspects of an organisation`s activities in the areas of Manufacturing, ERP, Demand Forecasting, Advanced Planning, S&OP, Supply Chain, Warehousing, Transport Management and HR (human resource).

 

Business intelligence (BI) is a set of theories, processes and technologies that convert raw data into useful information for business purposes. BI can handle large amounts of information to help identify and develop new opportunities to gain market advantage over competitors. The amounts of data that are now being gathered as a result of because they are increasingly being gathered by a growing range of diverse and ubiquitous information-gathering devices.

 

These data sets become so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using on-hand database management tools or traditional data processing applications. The trend to larger data sets is due to the additional information derivable from analysis of a single large set of related data, as compared to separate smaller sets with the same total amount of data. The current challenges of BIG DATA include the capture, storage, search and share capability, transfer, analysis, and visualisation. Every day, we create 2.5 quintillion bytes of data — so much that 90% of the data in the world today has been created in the last two years alone. This data comes from everywhere: sensors used to gather climate information, posts to social media sites, digital pictures and videos, purchase transaction records, and cell phone GPS signals to name a few. This data is big data.

 

It is estimated that the world's technological per-capita capacity to store information has roughly doubled every 40 months since the 1980s. The challenge for large enterprises is determining who should own big data initiatives that straddle the entire organisation and how this data can be used as a source of revenue and to gain competitive advantage.