Automatic Identification/Datacapture, AIDC, RFID

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the process of automatically identifying and collecting data about objects/goods, then logging this information in a computer. The term AIDC refers to a range of different types of data capture devices. These include barcodes, biometrics, RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), magnetic stripes, smart cards, OCR (Optical Character Recognition) and voice recognition. AIDC devices are deployed in a wide range of environments, including: retail, warehousing, distribution & logistics and field service. The first RFID solutions were developed in 1980s. It has since been deployed in a range of markets including Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems due to RFID's ability to track moving objects. RFID is also effective in challenging manufacturing environments where barcode labels might not prove resilient enough.

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IoT enabling the experience-based retailer

IoT enabling the experience-based retailer

The Internet of Things (IoT) will be pivotal in shaping the experience-based retailer of the future, says Beecham Research in its new 'Internet of Retail Market Brief'.

Harting Integrated Industry solutions featuring RFID systems and smart digital retrofit systems

Harting Integrated Industry solutions featuring RFID systems and smart digital retrofit systems

At the Industry 4.0 summit, Manchester Central Convention Complex, 4-5 April 2017, Harting (stand V25) will show its range of Industry 4.0 solutions, incorporating Modular Integrated Computer Architecture for industrial networking, and RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) systems.

RFID: Fact or Fiction?

RFID: Fact or Fiction?

By Andrew Blatherwick, Chairman, RELEX Solutions.

The industry may have been talking about RFID for 20 years, but it still has not come into common use or delivered significant value to retailers.

Apex to showcase asset management solutions at Multimodal 2017

Apex to showcase asset management solutions at Multimodal 2017

Apex Supply Chain Technologies will be at this year's Multimodal exhibition to showcase its range of automated dispensing solutions to manage, track and control critical assets, including supplies, tools and handheld scanners.

IoT heading for mass adoption by 2019 driven by better-than-expected business results

IoT heading for mass adoption by 2019 driven by better-than-expected business results

A new global study 'The Internet of Things: Today and Tomorrow' published by Aruba, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise company, reveals that IoT will soon be widespread as 85% of businesses plan to implement IoT by 2019, driven by a need for innovation and business efficiency.

SIX Payment Services supports WIR Bank for the launch of the new payment card for SMEs in Switzerland

SIX Payment Services supports WIR Bank for the launch of the new payment card for SMEs in Switzerland

As a service provider in cashless payments, SIX Payment Services (SIX) has announced its support of Swiss WIR Bank for the launch of a new payment card designed for small to medium sized businesses (SMEs).

New innovations by DENSO – UR20 scanner series with RFID technology

New innovations by DENSO – UR20 scanner series with RFID technology

The DENSO Auto-ID Business Unit, part of the Toyota group, is launching the new UR20 scanner series in spring 2017. These new readers, UR21 and UR22, are both equipped with the most modern RFID technology (Radio Frequency Identification).

Absence of BYOD policies among local authorities putting data at risk, warns Annodata

Absence of BYOD policies among local authorities putting data at risk, warns Annodata

Recent research from Managed Services Provider (MSP) Annodata has revealed that a high proportion of local authorities in England are yet to implement a 'Bring Your Own Device' (BYOD) policy.

Barix and Pricer to demonstrate new multi-sensory retail experience solution at EuroShop

Barix and Pricer to demonstrate new multi-sensory retail experience solution at EuroShop

IP audio and control solutions provider, Barix, continues to make in-roads into the global retail industry with SoundScape, its cloud-based solution for the management and distribution of background music and targeted advertising.

Red Ledge launches open RFID- and IIoT-ready asset management system

Red Ledge launches open RFID- and IIoT-ready asset management system

Software application and engineering company Red Ledge is launching a new asset management system (AMS) with open access to all RFID readers – bypassing the manufacturers' proprietary Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) - and to multiple Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) devices including all types of sensor, GPRS and RFID tags.

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC)

 

Automatic Identification and Data Capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

 

Barcoding has become established in several industries as an inexpensive and reliable automatic identification technology that can overcome human error in capturing and validating information. AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file which can be later analysed. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide

 

In the decades since its creation, barcoding has become highly standardised, resulting in lower costs and greater accessibility. Indeed, word processors now can produce barcodes, and many inexpensive printers print barcodes on labels. Most current barcode scanners can read between 12 and 15 symbols and all their variants without requiring configuration or programming. For specific scans the readers can be pre-programmed easily from the user manual.  

 

Despite these significant developments, the adoption of barcoding has been slower in the healthcare sector than the retail and manufacturing sectors. Barcoding can capture and prevent errors during medication administration and is now finding its way from the bedside into support operations within the hospital.

 

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is the wireless non-contact use of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data. Unlike a bar code, the tag does not necessarily need to be within line of sight of the reader, and may be embedded in the tracked object. It can also be read only or read-write enabling information to be either permanently stored in the tag or it can be read-write where information can be continually updated and over-written on the tag.

 

RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems and are now commonly used in tracking consumer products worldwide. Many manufacturers use the tags to track the location of each product they make from the time it's made until it's pulled off the shelf and tossed in a shopping cart. These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive. They can be used in pharmaceutical to track consignments, they can also be used in cold chain distribution to monitor temperature fluctuations. This is particularly useful to ensure frozen and chilled foods have not deviated from the required temperature parameters during transit.

 

Cost used to be a prohibitive factor in the widespread use of RFID tags however the unit costs have reduced considerably to make this a viable technology to improve track and trace throughout the supply chain. Many leading supermarket chains employ RFID insisting that their suppliers incorporate this technology into the packaging of the products in order to improve supply chain efficiency and traceability.